BRIEF HISTORY DURING THE SNOW ERA (1813-58)

The origin and conclusion of zoos in London started with the Edward Cross's Menagerie (1773-1829), proceeded to the Surrey Zoological Gardens (1831-1877), and culminated with the Zoological Gardens in Regent's Park (1828-present). 

Cross's Menagerie

A menagerie that featured animals and animal acts was opened by Edward Cross in 1773 in a building on the Strand near Waterloo Bridge, providing opportunity for people in London to seen wild animals up close. Cross's menagerie included lions, tigers, monkeys, a hippopotamus and a sloth. Among the most popular animals was Chunee, a five ton elephant who in 1825 became enraged and killed a keeper.  The following year, Chunee was shot to death when in an irritable mood he threatened to break the bars of his cage (see Elephant Killing below).  

Cross's Menagerie was demolished in 1829, following the move of his animals to Surrey Zoological Gardens on a 13 acre site east of Vauxhall Gardens. 

The former location in the 1859 map is in the middle of cell L 16, just above "RA" in Stand, right below Exeter Street and to the left of Wellington Street. 

LOCATION IN 1859 REYNOLDS MAP

(Quarter Mile Section - L 16)

Sources

Elmes J. Metropolitan Improvements or London in the Nineteenth Century, 1828. 

Richardson J. The Annals of London, 2000.

Saint A, Darley G. The Chronicles of London, 1994.

Weinreb B, Hibbert C (eds). The London Encyclopaedia, 1993.

Elephant Killing at Cross's in 1826

Click here to see site 33 years earlier

Another View of Elephant Killing at Cross's in 1826

Click here to see site 33 years earlier

View of Cross's Menagerie Entrance in 1829

Click here to see 30 years earlier

View of Cross's Menagerie in 1829

Click here to see 30 years earlier

Old Ordnance Survey Maps of 1873

Click here to see former location nine years later