BRIEF HISTORY DURING THE SNOW ERA (1813-58)

Regent's Canal was intended to flow along the northern border of Regent's Park.  John Nash had convinced the House of Commons and financiers that the canal would be good for the Regent's Park project, favored by the Crown.  After some money problems were resolved the canal was built, along with many road crossings.  Macclesfield Bridge was one of 40 bridges that crossed Regent's Canal from its beginning to end.  It was named for Charles Gerard, 1st Earl of Macclesfield. 

Macclesfield Bridge serves as one of four gates to Regent's Park, namely the north gate. The other three gates are Gloucester Gate (the east gate), York Gate (the south gate), and Hanover Gate (the west gate).  

The bridge is not labeled in Reynolds's 1859 map of London but does appear in the lower left corner of cell E9.  It is shown both by name and as a gate in Davies' map of 1843 (see below). 

LOCATION IN 1859 REYNOLDS MAP

(Quarter Mile Section - E 9)

Sources

Russell J. London, 1994.

Weinreb B, Hibbert C (eds). The London Encyclopaedia, 1993.

View of Macclesfield Bridge in 1823

Click here to see 36 years earlier

Site in Davies' London Map of 1843

Click here to see more details 16 years earlier

Old Ordnance Survey Maps of 1868

Click here to see more details nine years later